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Slowing Down

The past week has been pretty crazy! Last weekend was the final weekend of yoga teacher training for my group of

Let our powers combine

fellow trainees, therefore it was our testing weekend. We had both a written exam and a practical plus we had to watch our practical back and receive feedback. Ultimately we all successfully graduate on Sunday, but it was a pretty emotional weekend. We’ve all become really close and it is going to be very exciting to see where our paths take us. For me, who knows. I’m participating in a mentorship through the yoga studio that I graduated from, so for me, that is my next step, to continue to hone my teaching skills and hopefully be a successful teacher one day.

 

Also, in case you’ve noticed, I’m trying to include ads in the blog now for recipes and all things food. I was approved through a few affiliate programs and I’m playing around with WordPress to determine what plugins would help me run the ads but it’s so much more difficult than I thought it would be. It’s definitely a learning experience, but having knowledge of scripts and program codes would be extremely beneficial. Bear with me while I work through upgrading the site, it is a constant work in progress as I’m learning so glitches are bound to happen, but such is life. Things happen along the way of improving ourselves, we can’t take it personally, just learn and grow.

Figuring out this advert thing

Since this week has been busy with so much going on, I just wanted to take some time to slow down. I didn’t want to make a difficult recipe with multiple steps in it this week from Back to Basics. I wanted something simple and therapeutic. In the cooking realm, the most calming thing for me is doing something that I know I can do and do well. It isn’t the time to start some crazy endeavor like making croissants from scratch. For me, that is baking cookies. I feel like when you make cookies for years, you tend to learn a pattern that works for you and they just come naturally. Luckily Ina has a recipe for some Oatmeal Raisin Cookies in her Back to Basics book. I have no idea what I would have made otherwise.

Ready to devour

The BEST kind of cookies for me are ones that are thick, chock full of stuff, crisp on the outside, while still retaining some chewiness on the inside. This recipe hits all those marks. I know that the cup and a half of pecans and raisins sounds like overwhelming, but there can be NO such thing as too much. I mean, when making chocolate chip cookies, I don’t even bother with measuring the chips out, I just dump the whole bag in. I don’t have time for that.

If you’re one of those people that are turned off by raisins, you can sub them out for chocolate chips. Honestly though, why do people give serious hate to the raisins in oatmeal raisin cookies? Raisins are dried grapes, grapes make wine, you’re eating dried wine nuggets. Why can possibly be bad about them?

Anyway, the process of making the cookies is relatively simple and honestly is kind of like an assembly line, plus it gives me time to do stuff in between when they are in the oven. Also, there is nothing quite like a cookie that is still slightly warm after being baked. That is when they are the best.

 

Print Recipe
Raisin Pecan Oatmeal Cookies
From Back to Basics by Ina Garten page 214
Course Dessert
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 60 minutes
Passive Time 15 minutes
Servings
cookies
Ingredients
Course Dessert
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 60 minutes
Passive Time 15 minutes
Servings
cookies
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Place the pecans on a sheet pan and bake for 5 minutes, until crisp. Set aside to cool. Chop very coarsely.
  3. Beat the butter, brown sugar, and granulated sugar together on medium-high speed until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, and the vanilla.
  4. Sift the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt together into a medium bowl. Slowly add the dry ingredients to the butter mixture. Fold in the oats, raisins, and pecans with a rubber spatula and mix just until combined.
  5. Using a small ice-cream scoop or a tablespoon, drop 2-inch mounds of dough onto sheet pans lined with parchment paper. Flatten slightly with a damp hand. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, until lightly browned. Transfer the cookies to a baking rack and cool completely.
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The Spice of Life

You guys, it’s getting creepily close to Christmas and I’m not sure if I’m excited or sad! Maybe some of both. Excited for the holiday and sad that it is passing by so quickly!  As I sit here to write this, I have A Year Without a Santa Claus on tv and just listening to it brings back some of the childhood excitement the season brings me.

Having a little taste test before bed

With it being so close to the holiday, tis the season for some quality gingerbread. I’m not talking about the fancy Martha Stewartesque gingerbread houses all decked out with their candy cane gates and jolly rancher swimming pool. Ina offers up a much different version of gingerbread. It is a rustic dessert that is dense, spicy, and sweet. This is a perfect addition to any holiday dessert table this year. Also, it makes the whole house smell AMAZING. Think of it as edible potpourri. The orange frosting on top adds more flavor to the cake but you can opt to skip it and simply sprinkle it with powdered sugar.

How could this possibly be bad?!?!

This cake is sweetened by molasses, there is no other sugar actually in it. Molasses is a very dark, sweet, smoky syrup that gives gingerbread its unique color and flavor. One thing I did want to look up is what exactly unsulfured molasses is since the recipe specifically called for it. I’ve never really paid attention in the store. According to my research, molasses is the by product of the sugar making process. So when the sugar cane is crushed to make the little sugar granules we use to sweeten almost anything, the leftover is molasses. In some instances, sulfur is used during this process. I can only imagine that the sulfur adds a not too pleasant taste. I have also learned that most molasses in the states is unsulfured, so you don’t really have to worry about it. It’s always safe though to check the label to make sure.

Bubbly molasses and butter

This cake also has it’s fair share of spice in it. A whole teaspoon and a half of ground ginger root (it is gingerbread after all), cinnamon, and cloves give the cake balance with the earthy sweetness of the molasses. Another balancing ingredient which I think it totally necessary is the orange zest. You can’t taste it too much in the cake but it definitely adds a layer of flavor and helps cut through the sweetness.

I did make a few changes to the recipe, not major, but some differences. I didn’t use the recommended golden raisins, I used the regular ones. They are easier to find, taste the same, and I think more nostalgic looking. It reminds me of the applesauce cake my grandma made with the dark raisins in it. Also, I don’t have an 8×8 pan so I had to improvise. I do have a 6-cup bundt pan which worked perfectly, all I had to do was up the baking time by 15 minutes. If you use the bundt pan, I recommend baking the gingerbread for 45 minutes and check it and if it needs more time, add 5 minutes then check again. I got about 15 slices out of the bundt cake which was great as I had planned to take it to a work holiday lunch the next day.

A little edible decoration never hurt…

I decided to add a little extra Ina to my gingerbread. A mantra of hers is that she always garnishes a dish with an ingredient in the dish, “so you know exactly what’s in it.” So, I used my special zester that peels little strips off of the citrus. For this recipe, I zested half the orange which went into the cake, then I used this zester on the rest of the orange for the garnish. This isn’t necessary, you could just zest the rest of the orange regularly into the frosting to add extra flavor if you wanted. If you want to purchase a zester like this one, check out the amazon link below. Just make sure you zest BEFORE you cut and juice the orange, otherwise it’ll be a mess.

A great wine to pair this with is Winc’s new sparkling wine, Fink’s Widow. Bubbly just screams holidays and it is great for cocktails or after a meal with dessert. It has a lot of great apple and even pineapple flavors that are really crisp on the palate with the effervescence. You can’t beat the price on this one – only $13. That’s about the same price as prosecco. Many sparkling wines are difficult to find that cheaply (that are good), but this one is definitely a winner. It’s great on it’s own, but I was tempted into turning it into a holiday mimosa. Use this link for a discount on your first order: https://hi.winc.com/2lhy61q4ll7.

FW spreading some holiday cheer!

I first got the idea for this cocktail by seeing sugared cranberries and wanting to make them. When you make sugared cranberries, you cook them for a little and then let them soak in a mixture of sugar and water. The leftover syrup is turned slightly red from the cranberries and has great flavors. I added about 2 teaspoons of the simple syrup to 2 Tablespoons of cranberry cocktail mix and then topped it with the Finke’s Widow. I put the finished sugared cranberries on a large toothpick as garnish. SO GOOD! The cranberry flavor is balanced out by the sweetness of the syrup and the wine adds some crispness to the drink. This is one you’ll definitely want to make for your holiday party. As an alternative to the sugared cranberries, you can always freeze some fresh cranberries and use them as ice cubes in your drink as garnish and to keep the drink cold without watering it down.

Festive and refreshing


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Print Recipe
Old-Fashioned Gingerbread
From Back to Basics by Ina Garten, page 202
Course Dessert
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Passive Time 3 hours
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Dessert
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Passive Time 3 hours
Servings
people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 8x8-inch cake pan. Place the rum and raisins in a small pan, cover, and heat until the rum boils. Turn off the heat and set aside. Place the butter and molasses in another small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Pour the mixture into a large mixing bowl. Cool for 5 minutes, then mix in the sour cream and orange zest.
  2. Meanwhile, sift the flour, baking soda, ginger, cinnamon, cloves and salt together into a small bowl. Mix to combine. With the mixer on low speed, slowly add the flour mixture to the molasses mixture and mix only until smooth.
  3. Drain the raisins and add them and the crystallized ginger to the mixture with a spatula. Pour into the prepared pan and bake for about 35 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Set aside to cool completely.
  4. When the cake is cooled, whisk together the confectioner's sugar and orange juice and pour it over the gingerbread allowing it to drip down the sides. Cut into 9 squares.
Recipe Notes

You can use a 6 cup bundt pan. If so, increase baking time to 45 minutes and if it isn't done completely, put back into the over for another 5 minutes. Using a bundt pan yields about 12-15 slices of cake.

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